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Jayson Werth Takes Money Over Winning, Kensington Strangler Kills Again, and Ben Roethlisberger's Broken Nose Performance

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The Omelette Monday December 6, 2010

Jayson Werth Prefers Money Over Winning

Turns out that Jayson Werth leaving Philadelphia is a sure thing. There never was any doubt that he would leave since the Phillies never really negotiated with Scott Boras. Jayson Werth yesterday proved what is wrong with sports today. He, like most athletes could care less about winning and would rather be paid ridiculous money and play for a losing team. Werth turned his back on the Philadelphia Phillies and signed a 7-year $126 million deal with the perennial last-place Washington Nationals. The Nationals are years away from contending for anything other than 3rd place in the NL East. At least Jayson Werth has financial security for life. Good luck in D.C. - you'll need it.

The Kensington Strangler Possibly Strikes Again

It looks like Philadelphia citizens may have a serial killer on their hands known as the "Kensington Strangler." The body of 22-year-old Allison Edwards was found inside an apartment. She like two other victims was strangled to death. A fourth victim was able to escape prior to the other murders and identified the alleged serial killer. Philadelphia has a very serious situation on their hands.

Ben Roethlisberger's Gritty Broken Nose Sunday Night Performance

Finally, Ben Roethlisberger played essentially the entire game of last night's Steelers-Ravens game with a broken nose. Ravens defensive tackle Haloti Ngata (who should have been ejected) took a cheap shot at Big Ben and punched him in the nose on the third play of the game. Roethlisberger's nose was clearly broken and it was bleeding the entire game.  Ultimately, The Steelers got vindication in the form of a come-from-behind 13-10 victory. It was yet another 4th quarter comeback for the veteran QB. Roethlisberger also had a banged up foot. His performance is reminiscient of Curt Schilling's infamous "bloody sock" performance in the 2004 ALCS against the Yankees.