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Edwin Jackson's Bizarro World No-Hitter Making 2010 Year Of No-Hitter

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water cooler              logoThe 2010 Baseball Season is slowly becoming the year of the no-hitter.  Now that Arizona Diamondbacks hurler Edwin Jackson threw the most unlikely of no-hitters (perhaps ever) there have now been four no-hitters thrown in just under half a season.

Ubaldo Jiminez, Dallas Braden, Roy Halladay, and Edwin Jackson have now tossed no-hitters.  This could become the year of the no-hitter much like 1990 and 1991 when seven no hitters were thrown. 1990 and 1991 stand as the seasons with the most no-hitters in the modern era.  There were actually eight thrown in 1884.

Lets not forget that Detroit Tigers hurler Armando Galarraga was robbed of a perfect game.  Had Jim Joyce made the correct call it would have made it five no-no's on the season.

Last night Edwin Jackson walked seven batters in the first three innings and looked wilder than a drunken Jim Morrison after one of his concerts. He calmed down and only had one more walk the entire game-thus yielding eight walks. Added to that, he threw 149 pitches in the game-the highest total by any pitcher in five years.  Yikes.  Hopefully he doesn't go the way of Mark Prior after that performance.

Ubaldo Jiminez and Roy Halladay threw perfect games this year.  Suffice it to say, Edwin Jackson's no-hitter is the anti-perfect game.  The numbers defy all logic, but then again that's why we watch baseball.  On any given night we might see something that we have never seen before and may never see again. Edwin Jackson's 149 pitches are the most pitches ever thrown in a no-hitter according to baseballreference.com.  His eight walks also seem like an obvious record in a no-hitter performance, but think again.

One would think this never happened before, but I did some digging and A.J. Burnett actually surrendered nine walks in his no hitter against the Padres in 2001.

That stands as the record for most walks by a pitcher in a no-hitter performance.  Now, that may never happen again.